NED: Autocam Medical partners with the University of Michigan to tackle ventilator shortages

Researchers at the University of Michigan, collaborating with Autocam Medical, have tackled the COVID-19 crisis of potential ventilator shortages globally and developed VentMI in remarkable time—from prototype to available for use in under a month. This new ventilator splitter overcomes a previously critical limitation for the shared use of these devices. Previous splitters could deliver only one pre-set pressure to patients even though each patient requires a unique pressure tailored to their lung size and degree of disease. Excessive volume or pressure can cause lung trauma, thereby limiting the ability to share a ventilator.

Conceived only weeks ago by Dr. Kyle VanKoevering of the Department of Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at Michigan Medicine and an associate faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the new splitter was designed, prototyped, tested and received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the FDA. In less than a week, Autocam Medical was mobilized to implement Design for Manufacturing (DFM) processes and started manufacturing the VentMI. Autocam Medical is poised to make hundreds of new devices before the end of April.

A new company formed by U-M inventors, MakeMedical LLC, has licensed the technology from U-M and will provide VentMI at cost to other institutions. Autocam Medical is providing its manufacturing services at cost, as well. Of significant note, the VentMI costs only one-hundredth that of a new ventilator, thereby helping to reduce vent costs into the future as well.

Continue reading at NED…

TODAY’S MOTOR VEHICLES: Autocam Medical, University of Michigan, Make Medical Collaborate to Produce Ventilator Device Amid COVID-19

Researchers at the University of Michigan, collaborating with Autocam Medical, have tackled the COVID-19 crisis of potential ventilator shortages globally and developed VentMI in remarkable time – from prototype to available for use in under a month. This new ventilator splitter overcomes a previously critical limitation for shared use of these devices. Previous splitters could deliver only one pre-set pressure to patients even though each patient requires a unique pressure tailored to their lung size and degree of disease. Excessive volume or pressure can cause lung trauma, thereby limiting the ability to share a ventilator.

Conceived only weeks ago by Dr. Kyle VanKoevering of the Department of Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at Michigan Medicine and an associate faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the new splitter was designed, prototyped, tested, and received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the FDA. In less than a week, Autocam Medical was mobilized to implement design for manufacturing (DFM) processes and started manufacturing the VentMI. Autocam Medical is poised to produce hundreds of the new device.

A new company formed by U-M inventors, MakeMedical LLC, has licensed the technology from U-M and will provide VentMI at cost to other institutions. Autocam Medical is providing its manufacturing services at cost, as well. Of significant note, the VentMI costs only one-hundredth that of a new ventilator, thereby helping to reduce vent costs into the future as well.

“We’re extremely grateful to have been asked to participate in the creation of this vital new product,” comments John Kennedy, CEO of Autocam Medical. “And we’re very proud of our team’s ability to go from prototype through manufacturing, engineering, to finished product in a matter of days to help meet this crucial need for the healthcare community.”

Continue reading at Today’s Motor Vehicles…

AEROSPACE MANUFACTURING & DESIGN: Autocam Medical Provides Quick-Turn Manufacturing for Breakthrough Ventilator Splitter

Researchers at the University of Michigan, collaborating with Autocam Medical, have tackled the COVID-19 crisis of potential ventilator shortages globally and developed VentMI in remarkable time – from prototype to available for use in under a month. This new ventilator splitter overcomes a previously critical limitation for shared use of these devices. Previous splitters could deliver only one pre-set pressure to patients even though each patient requires a unique pressure tailored to their lung size and degree of disease. Excessive volume or pressure can cause lung trauma, thereby limiting the ability to share a ventilator.

Conceived only weeks ago by Dr. Kyle VanKoevering of the Department of Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at Michigan Medicine and an associate faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the new splitter was designed, prototyped, tested, and received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the FDA. In less than a week, Autocam Medical was mobilized to implement design for manufacturing (DFM) processes and started manufacturing the VentMI. Autocam Medical is poised to produce hundreds of the new device.

A new company formed by U-M inventors, MakeMedical LLC, has licensed the technology from U-M and will provide VentMI at cost to other institutions. Autocam Medical is providing its manufacturing services at cost, as well. Of significant note, the VentMI costs only one-hundredth that of a new ventilator, thereby helping to reduce vent costs into the future as well.

Continue reading at Aerospace Manufacturing & Design…

GRBJ: Partners create problem-solving ventilator splitter

Kentwood-based Autocam Medical partnered with researchers at the University of Michigan and a 3D printing company to develop a device that allows ventilators to safely treat two patients at once.

The partners tackled the global shortage of ventilators by developing VentMI from prototype to market in under a month.

The device is a new ventilator splitter that “overcomes a previously critical limitation for shared use of these devices.” Previous splitters could deliver only one pre-set pressure to patients, which was problematic because each COVID-19 patient requires a unique pressure tailored to their lung size and degree of disease, according to Autocam Medical. Excessive volume or pressure can cause lung trauma, thereby limiting the ability to share a ventilator, the company said.

Conceived a few weeks ago by Dr. Kyle VanKoevering, of the department of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at U-M’s Michigan Medicine and an associate faculty member in the school’s department of biomedical engineering, the new VentMI splitter has been designed, prototyped, tested and received emergency use authorization (EUA) from the FDA.

Autocam Medical was mobilized to implement design for manufacturing (DFM) processes and started manufacturing the VentMI.

Continue reading at GRBJ…

SME: Autocam Medical Works With University of Michigan to Bring Ventilator Splitter to Market in Record Time

Dr. Kyle VanKoevering of MakeMedical, LLC, approached Autocam Medical with a drawing of a “splitter” device that could enable one ventilator to assist two patients at the same time. Dr. VanKoevering is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Medical School. He has broad experience in the application of 3D Printing for diagnostic and surgical applications, having played a key role in several groundbreaking and novel uses of additive manufacturing in medicine. His work continues in this field while he continues to provide excellent care and leadership at the University of Michigan.

The “splitter” device is called VentMI™ (Ventilate Multiple Individuals) and its purpose is to help provide mechanical ventilation to two patients from a single ventilator. “We know that individualized pressure control and the addition of other components is the key to effective ventilation,” said Dr. VanKoevering. “Combining custom pressure regulators and one-way valves, this system has been tested in simulated lung and animal environments, and has Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from FDA.”

When asked if Autocam Medical could use their manufacturing skills and experience to rapidly develop prototypes of several components for the piece, the answer was a resounding, “Yes!”

Continue reading at SME…

MPO: Autocam Medical, University of Michigan Tackle COVID-19 with Ventilator Splitter

Researchers at the University of Michigan, collaborating with Autocam Medical, have tackled the COVID-19 crisis of potential ventilator shortages globally and developed VentMI in remarkable time—from prototype to available for use in under a month. This new ventilator splitter overcomes a previously critical limitation for shared use of these devices. Previous splitters could deliver only one pre-set pressure to patients even though each patient requires a unique pressure tailored to their lung size and degree of disease. Excessive volume or pressure can cause lung trauma, thereby limiting the ability to share a ventilator.

Conceived only weeks ago by Dr. Kyle VanKoevering of the Department of Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at Michigan Medicine and an associate faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the new splitter was designed, prototyped, tested and received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. In less than a week, Autocam Medical was mobilized to implement Design for Manufacturing (DFM) processes and started manufacturing the VentMI. Autocam Medical was poised to make hundreds of the new devices before the end of April.

Continue reading at MPO…

BONEZONE: COVID-19 Amplifies Forecasting Challenges for OEMs and Suppliers

COVID-19 has magnified the challenges that OEMs and suppliers face in establishing manufacturing forecasts. Globally, manufacturers are responding to postponed procedures and even some facility closures. The pandemic dynamics are likely to create uncertainty for the orthopedic supply chain for the next 12 to 18 months.

We hosted a virtual roundtable to gain insight from both device companies and contract manufacturers about collaborative forecasting in today’s orthopedic space. Julie Sutton, Supply Chain Director for NN Life Sciences, led the discussion on ways to manage information, processes and behaviors to overcome obstacles and attain mutual success, particularly in the context of ambiguous timelines such as with the current global crisis.

Here in Part 1 of the recapped conversation, we focus specifically on COVID-19. Part 2 breaks down ways that device companies and contract manufacturers use forecasts as well as best practices for greater adoption and accuracy.

The participants included:

  • John Kennedy IV, General Manager, Autocam Medical
  • Shannon Mills, Supply Chain Director, Zimmer Biomet
  • Michele Roskowiak, Demand Planning Manager, Wright Medical
  • Greg Stalcup, CEO, SITES Medical
  • Julie Sutton, Supply Chain Director, NN Life Sciences

Continue reading at BONEZONE…

MAKE PARTS FAST: Autocam Medical Brings University of Michigan Ventilator Splitter from Conception to Development in Less than a Month

Researchers at the University of Michigan, collaborating with Autocam Medical, have tackled the COVID-19 crisis of potential ventilator shortages globally and developed VentMI in remarkable time—from prototype to available for use in under a month. This new ventilator splitter overcomes a previously critical limitation for shared use of these devices. Previous splitters could deliver only one pre-set pressure to patients even though each patient requires a unique pressure tailored to their lung size and degree of disease. Excessive volume or pressure can cause lung trauma, thereby limiting the ability to share a ventilator.

Conceived only weeks ago by Dr. Kyle VanKoevering of the Department of Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at Michigan Medicine and an associate faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the new splitter was designed, prototyped, tested and received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the FDA. In less than a week, Autocam Medical was mobilized to implement Design for Manufacturing (DFM) processes and started manufacturing the VentMI.

A new company formed by U-M inventors, MakeMedical LLC, has licensed the technology from U-M and will provide VentMI at cost to other institutions. Autocam Medical is providing its manufacturing services at cost, as well. The VentMI costs only one-hundredth that of a new ventilator, thereby helping to reduce vent costs into the future as well.

Continue reading at Make Parts Fast…

THE SAULT NEWS: Autocam Medical Works with University of Michigan to Produce Device that Helps Multiple Patients Breathe on One Ventilator

In March, as the coronavirus pandemic swept through China and began hitting Europe, before stay-at-home orders and worst-case global coronavirus deaths were predicted into the hundreds of thousands of people, medical professionals began to worry about whether there were enough ventilators for all the patients who would need them.

A team of U-M doctors specializing in creating medical inventions through 3D printing started brainstorming. One week after creating sketches in a notebook, they had a working prototype for a new type of device to split one ventilator between multiple patients — in a way that solves one of the primary concerns of that controversial, last-resort practice: the lack of the ability for doctors to make individual oxygen adjustments for each connected patient.

The doctors group, MakeMedical LLC, has applied for a patent on its VentMI device. It has been tested on animals and received authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for emergency use amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Continue reading at The Sault News….

MSN: Autocam Medical Manufactures Device From U-M Allowing Multiple Patients to Breathe on One Ventilator

In March, as the coronavirus pandemic swept through China and began hitting Europe, before stay-at-home orders and worst-case global coronavirus deaths were predicted into the hundreds of thousands of people, medical professionals began to worry about whether there were enough ventilators for all the patients who would need them.

A team of U-M doctors specializing in creating medical inventions through 3D printing started brainstorming. One week after creating sketches in a notebook, they had a working prototype for a new type of device to split one ventilator between multiple patients — in a way that solves one of the primary concerns of that controversial, last-resort practice: the lack of the ability for doctors to make individual oxygen adjustments for each connected patient.

Continue reading at MSN…