U-M LAB LOG: Personalized Device Could Support Multiple COVID-19 Patients From Single Ventilator

As the pandemic swept across the nation in March, so did urgent questions about the virus’ potential strain on the healthcare system.

Among top concerns: whether the nation’s hospitals had enough ventilators to provide breathing support to critically ill patients with the disease COVID-19, which mainly attacks the lungs.

As experts predicted a surge in coronavirus cases and a possible shortage in intensive care unit equipment, University of Michigan teams immediately got to work on a solution. The mission: to quickly develop an efficient, affordable and more controlled way to expand ventilator capacity.

Now, just weeks later, U-M and Michigan Medicine researchers have invented an individualized vent-splitter that may allow multiple patients to receive customized pressures while sharing a single ventilator. U-M has filed for patent protection on the technology, and a local start-up, MakeMedical LLC, has licensed the technology and developed it into the VentMI device.

Continue reading at U-M LabLog…

WZZM 13: Autocam Medical to Manufacture University of Michigan and Makemedical Device Allowing Multiple Patients to Use Same Ventilator with Individual Pressure

When experts predicted a surge in COVID-19 cases and possible ICU equipment shortages, University of Michigan healthcare workers started making a controlled way to expand ventilator capacity.

Now, U-M and Michigan Medicine researchers invented an individualized vent-splitter that may allow multiple patients to receive customized pressures while sharing a ventilator.

U-M has filed for patent protection on the technology and a local start-up, MakeMedical, LLC, has liscensed the technology and developed it into the VentMITM device.

The device has been tested on animals and received emergency use authorization from the FDA.

“It has taken relentless positive action by a large number of individuals all motivated by the common good to make this happen,” says Glenn Green, M.D., a pediatric otolaryngologist at Michigan Medicine C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and co-developer of the technology.

The team has spent the last few weeks using in-house 3D printing to produce multiple prototypes. test them on machines in a hospital operating room, and evaluate how the technology worked on pigs.

The FDA’s emergency authorization means the device can be used on humans if needed.

“We have been working 24/7 to develop a system that could at least double ventilator capacity,” says Michigan Medicine otolaryngologist Kyle VanKoevering, M.D., who is also an associate faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Michigan Engineering.

Continue reading at WZZM 13…

CLICK ON DETROIT: Autocam Medical to Manufacture Ventilator Device to Support Multiple COVID-19 Victims on a Single Ventilator with Individual Pressure

University of Michigan and Michigan Medicine researchers have invented a device to help multiple COVID-19 patients receive personalized gas pressures and pressure monitoring from a single ventilator.

Using 3D printing, researchers created an affordable and mobile vent splitter, a device that allows different patients to use one ventilator.

The team of researchers made the VentMI device as a response to predicted shortages in intensive care unit equipment for patients with COVID-19.

With current vent splitters, there are limitations on how ventilators can be used. Since shared ventilator circuits only deliver one pre-set pressure, patients using the ventilator must have similarly-sized lungs and needs.

The personalized settings of the VentMI allow patients with different ventilator needs and lung capacities to share a ventilator. The technology works by slowly releasing compressed air to patients, like a scuba tank regulator.

Continue reading at ClickOnDetroit…

NEWS-MEDICAL: University of Michigan and Makemedical Ventilator Splitter with Individual Pressure Capability to be Manufactured by Autocam Medical

As the pandemic swept across the nation in March, so did urgent questions about the virus’ potential strain on the healthcare system.

Among top concerns: whether the nation’s hospitals had enough ventilators to provide breathing support to critically ill patients with the disease COVID-19, which mainly attacks the lungs.

As experts predicted a surge in coronavirus cases and a possible shortage in intensive care unit equipment, University of Michigan teams immediately got to work on a solution. The mission: to quickly develop an efficient, affordable and more controlled way to expand ventilator capacity.

Now, just weeks later, U-M and Michigan Medicine researchers have invented an individualized vent-splitter that may allow multiple patients to receive customized pressures while sharing a single ventilator. U-M has filed for patent protection on the technology, and a local start-up, MakeMedical LLC, has licensed the technology and developed it into the VentMITM device.

The VentMITM device has been tested in animals and received emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. MakeMedical, which U-M inventors have equity in, will provide the device at cost to other institutions without any profit for U-M or the company.

Continue reading at News-Medical…

LAB LOG U-M: COVID-19 Ventilator Invention Developed by University of Michigan and Makemedical to Be Produced by Autocam Medical

As the pandemic swept across the nation in March, so did urgent questions about the virus’ potential strain on the healthcare system.

Among top concerns: whether the nation’s hospitals had enough ventilators to provide breathing support to critically ill patients with the disease COVID-19, which mainly attacks the lungs.

As experts predicted a surge in coronavirus cases and a possible shortage in intensive care unit equipment, University of Michigan teams immediately got to work on a solution. The mission: to quickly develop an efficient, affordable and more controlled way to expand ventilator capacity.

Now, just weeks later, U-M and Michigan Medicine researchers have invented an individualized vent-splitter that may allow multiple patients to receive customized pressures while sharing a single ventilator. U-M has filed for patent protection on the technology, and a local start-up, MakeMedical LLC, has licensed the technology and developed it into the VentMI device.

Continue reading at Lab Log U-M…

WOODTV: Autocam Medical: Keeping Workers Safe

As the debate continues about the health risks and economic benefits of getting Michigan to work, the owner of a West Michigan company that has remained open says industry can go forward if safeguards are enforced.

Kentwood-based Autocam Medical, which makes precision-machined surgical drill bits, drivers, screws, plates, cutting tools and other complex medical device components, is already following safety rules.

“We have the advantage of operating in China,” owner John Kennedy said, explaining that meant Autocam had to adopt stringent guidelines the Chinese government instituted to prevent another outbreak.

Kennedy has brought those best practices to his U.S. plants, creating what he believes is a back-to-work path other manufacturers could follow.

“We just took those same practices and said, ‘OK, they seem to be working in China… we haven’t had any infection or anything else, so let’s adopt them here,’” Kennedy said. “I think coming into our plant is a lot safer than what I’ve seen when I go to the grocery store.”

Each Autocam employee’s temperature is checked before every shift. Those who are not feeling well, even if it’s just a cold, are told to stay home at full pay. Everyone who does work wears a mask.

Kennedy believes social distancing is making the biggest difference. A single chair is located at every break room table to prevent employee congregation. The same distancing procedures extend to the production floor.

Continue reading at WOODTV…

THE DETROIT NEWS: How to do business, and stay safe

John Kennedy operates three manufacturing plants, including one in West Michigan, that have remained opened throughout the COVID-19 pandemic to produce essential medical devices.

Of 500 employees, only one, in Plymouth, Mass., has come down with the virus, and has recovered. It’s not by chance.

Kennedy’s Autocam Medical has instituted rigorous precautions to protect worker safety, including social distancing within the plants, mandatory face masks and a zero entrance policy for workers who show any symptoms of illness.

“We take everyone’s temperature before they enter the facility,” Kennedy says. “We took most of the chairs out of the conference rooms and stand up in meetings to maintain social distancing.”

All day long, cleaners wipe down every flat surface with cleanser. No visitors are allowed inside. And the social distancing rule is strictly enforced.

Kennedy, who is also chairman of the West Michigan Policy Forum, believes a large number of businesses in the state could safely reopen using the practices Autocam employs. The policy forum Friday endorsed a blueprint presented by Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey that offers guidelines for a safe reopening of the state economy.

Continue reading at The Detroit News…

GRBJ: Autocam Medical’s John Kennedy, IV Honored as GRBJ Newsmaker of the Year

John Kennedy IV, general manager of Autocam Medical, was named the Grand Rapids Business Journal’s Newsmaker of the Year in the Manufacturing category. He was honored during the publication’s recent Newsmaker of the Year awards breakfast held at Frederik Meijer Gardens.

Continue reading at GRBJ…

BONEZONE: Autocam Medical Presents Engineering Scholarships to University Students

Autocam Medical awarded engineering scholarships to three Grand Valley State University students.

Autocam Medical President and CEO and former university Board of Trustees member, John C. Kennedy, established the scholarship program to encourage and educate students about changes that have occurred in advanced manufacturing.

“The field has evolved significantly over the past couple of decades,” he said. “Many students have only had a minimal amount of exposure to manufacturing. It is our hope that this scholarship raises the awareness, and enhances the perception, of advanced manufacturing among college students.”

The competitive scholarship is open to full-time Grand Valley State students entering their sophomore year in the Seymour and Esther Padnos College of Engineering and Computing. Students are selected for their academic merit and ability to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards. They also must declare a major in Mechanical Engineering, Product Design Manufacturing & Engineering, and/or Interdisciplinary Engineering (with a focus on Manufacturing Engineering).

As part of the process, students may also to participate in three paid co-ops with Autocam Medical during the summer of their first, second and third years.

The three student recipients are Michael Flickenger, Eric Braun and Zach Lobbestael.

Continue reading at BONEZONE…